Disneyland Entrance & Exit

BACKSTORY: Welcome to Disneyland! This page features photos of the entrance and exit area to the park, as well as the Kennel area for dogs and other beloved family pets not allowed into the park.

When the park opened, an adult admission ticket cost $1. Three months later, a new system that included ticket books (with A, B, and C coupons) was created. The lettered coupons were good for specific attractions, with "A" tickets being for the "lesser" or not quite as exciting attractions, and the "C" coupons being for the more elaborate attractions. 1956 saw the introduction of the "D" ticket, with the most famous ticket of all, the "E" ticket being added in 1959. The term "E Ticket" has become a phrase all its own, generating the meaning of a truly spectacular attraction. Originally, "E" tickets were 50¢ each, and were typically the first tickets to disappear from the coupon books. In 1982, all of the lettered attraction tickets were retired, and the park went back to a general admission system.

For the naysayers that said Disneyland wouldn't make it...
• 9/8/1955: 1 millionth guest, Elsa Marquez.
• 12/31/1957: 10 millionth guest, Leigh Woolfenden
• 4/19/1961: 25 millionth guest, Dr. Glenn C. Franklin
• 8/12/1965: 50 millionth guest, Mary Adams
• 6/17/1971: 100 millionth guest, Valerie Suldo (see the story of her visit here)
• 1/8/1981: 200 millionth guest, Gert Schelvis
• 9/1/1989: 300 millionth guest, Claudine Masson
* 7/5/1997: 400 millionth guest, Minnie Pepito
• 3/15/2001: 450 millionth guest, Mark Ramirez

The original park marquee was erected in 1958; it was changed in the mid 1960's to an all-white color scheme (the yellow D was gone). In 1989, the big pink cream and aqua marquee sign replaced the original.

So far, three different signs have stood at the Harbor Boulevard entrance. The Walt Disney Company auctioned the famous Disneyland sign that greeted park guests at the park's Harbor Boulevard entrance from 1989 -1999 in 2003. The sign was taken apart and auctioned in three lots: the Disneyland marquee letters, approximately 13.5' white letters comprising the Disneyland logo; "The Happiest Place on Earth" sign that served as the sign's subtitle; and the approximately 18' tall gold castle detail that topped the marquee. Bidding ended July 24, 2003. The sign had been taken down due to the construction of Disney's California Adventure in 1999. Actor John Stamos purchased the reverse side of the marquee letters with a closing bid of $30,700 when they went up for auction in 2000.

Prices for high quality photo prints of the images on my site can be found on my main Photography page. The social media buttons below will help you connect to Daveland for more creativity & fun!

1955—1956

STEVE MARTIN: DISNEYLAND GUIDE BOOK SALES BOY

Guidebook Sales Boy photo, September 1958Guidebook Sales Boy photo, 1950sBACKSTORY: Steve Martin began his “career” at Disneyland hawking guidebooks for the park. The two photos here show some of the lads who made some coin by doing just that. As Steve recalls:

“Well, this to me is an amazing photo. It’s not me (nor is the other one), but only one of two photos I’ve seen of the guidebook salesboys, and the ONLY one I’ve seen of a kid in operation inside the gate. I was beginning to doubt our existence!  The kid on the right is standing on the exact spot that I used to work, right in front of the west newsstand, taken from the other view that was in the Robbins Barstow film that I accidentally appeared in at the Main Gate. This boy is older than I would have been and I don’t recognize him. He looks about 14-15; I left by the time I was 13, maybe 12 to go work as a trick roper in Frontierland.  And how shocking that his sleeves are rolled up!

He is wearing a straw hat. I wore a felt top hat (because I loved magic) until they made us wear a straw hat, but I loved the straw hat too. The outfit he is wearing is perfect. I may have even worn that vest. It’s so familiar I can smell it.  His left pocket is bulging because it’s full of coins from guide book sales. We never wore pins because we worked for a leasee.

When I first started, we worked outside the main gate and worked the crowd as they approached the ticket booth, then we were moved inside about a month later because, I was told, it was too tacky to have the first thing the guests see was boys hawking things. I remember Ray Amendt (and his wife Alma). Big cigar smoking carney type. He ran the Disneyland News and stroller concession too, and always walked by us saying 'Tell ‘em about the strollers!'

The day I left being a guide book salesman—he fired me because I was too hung up on checking the dates on coins—he said, 'Good luck, kid.' Luckily I got a job the same day demoing trick ropes in Frontierland.” 

Martin’s next Disneyland gig was selling souvenir spinning lassos in Frontierland, followed by demonstrating and selling packaged magic tricks and joke novelties at the old Merlin's Magic Shop in Fantasyland, where he became an accomplished magician. He learned to juggle from Disneyland Court Jester, Christopher Fair, and modeled his trademark, “Well, excuuuuuse me,” phrase on the exasperated outbursts of a woman he worked with.

Steve Martin Disneyland Guidebook Sales Boy photo, 1957Just like Steve Martin, George “Moe” Collins began his career at Disneyland as a guidebook salesman back in the park’s early years, riding his bike to the park down Katella Avenue, which was only a 2 lane street at the time. He would return to Disney some 20 years later, working as a staff writer at WED Imagineering, hired by and working for Marty Sklar. Here are Moe’s comments on the 1957 photo at left, which shows a young Steve Martin selling guidebooks & posing with two young ladies:

The lyrics from '“Bookends” by Simon and Garfunkel, come drifting back. “Long ago, I have a photograph…preserve our memories…”

In the summer of 1956, I had the good fortune to become a guidebook salesman at a place where most kids in America would have loved to work. Still star struck in the wonder of Davy Crockett, and The Mickey Mouse Club, it was like stepping back in time and onto a stage. I didn't know anything about sales, or money matters for that manner, but I jumped at the chance to do anything that Disneyland would offer. I would have scooped up the expended horse fuel behind the trolley if there had been an opening.

I was so excited about getting the job that I could hardly wait to ride my bike home and tell my family and friends, who lived on Dewey Drive in Garden Grove. One of those Dewey Drive friends was a boy who seemed to be even more excited about my “triumph” and shyly asked if I could possibly help him get a job doing the same thing. Bingo. A Star Was Born. Not only did he become a top guidebook salesman, he eventually became a Disney Legend and one of America's greatest entertainment treasures…Steve Martin.

On the weekends and during summer vacation and holidays, we would ride our bikes to the park down Katella Avenue…a two lane street then…and go to wardrobe where they dressed us in 1890's garb, replete with candy striped shirts and a top hat. We looked and felt the part, and we appreciated that humble beginning. We still do to this very day, sharing memories and pictures of those halçyon days.

Many years later, I would become a staff writer at Disney's Imagineering division…the master planners of Disneyland, Walt Disney World, and every Disney theme park throughout the world. Although I stayed only 6 years, I am still brushing pixie dust off my shoulders. Steve still does things from time to time for Disney and he, too, never forgets. He remembered my small role in helping him get his first job, and on December 2, 2007, I was thrilled, and deeply moved, to be his guest at The Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, honoring Steve for his exemplary lifetime achievements in the performing arts. Nice going, Steve, and thanks for the memories.

1957—1958

1959/1950s

THE DISNEYLAND KENNEL

Vacationland Summer 1967 Art 2BACKSTORY: From the Disney Parks Blog:

The Disneyland Kennel Club opened as the Ken-L Land Pet Motel on January 18, 1958. Participating in the opening ceremonies were Old Yeller’s son, Duke, and Kevin Corcoran, the youthful star of the film who would become a Disney Legend. If you’ve ever boarded your pets at the Disneyland Kennel Club while visiting the Disneyland Resort, you may remember Ginny Bullock, who will tell you about her role as a Disneyland Kennel Club attendant in this installment of Every Role a Starring Role:

"It was Walt Disney's idea because he was a big animal person, he loved animals...he was afraid people would leave their pets in the car, and he wanted the guests who were visiting Disneyland to be able to have a safe and secure spot to board their pets for the day. The majority of our pets are dogs, and then we have a lot of cats."

1960

VACATIONLAND MAGAZINE SUMMER 1960

Guidebook Sales Boy photo, September 1958Guidebook Sales Boy photo, 1950sAt the main gate…park your pets in Ken-L-Ration's KEN-L-LAND

Any pet—dog, cat, or whatever—is welcome to htis clean, airy, well-tended "pet motel." Uniformed attendants lavish expert care on your pet. The twenty-five cent service charge includes a meal of appetizing Ken-L-Ration for dogs, apropriate refreshment for other pets. Your pet may stay the whole day.

Ken-L-Ration's KEN-L-LAND
—a service of the makers of America's most trusted dog food

Guidebook Sales Boy photo, 1950s

WHERE IS DISNEYLAND LOCATED?
Disneyland is located within the city of Anaheim, California, about 35 minutes by autmobile from downtown Los Angeles To reach Disneyland by automobile from Los Angeles, take the Santa Ana Freeway southeast to Harbor Boulevard in Anaheim. To reach Disneyland from other locations in Southern California refer to the map of this area appearing on pages 14 and 15 of VACATIONLAND.

WHAT HOURS IS DISNEYLAND OPEN?
From June 1 to June 11, Disneyland is open every day from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Beginning June 11 Disneyland is open every day from 9 a.m. to midnight, and open until 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday ("Date Nite"). Note: the "Fantasy in the Sky" fireworks show is presented every night at 9 p.m. starting June 11 and continuing through September 11. The Fall-Winter schedule (closed Monday and Tuesday) will resume on September 19.

HOW LONG SHOULD YOU PLAN TO STAY?
Disneyland is designed so that you can enjoy a complete visit to the Magic Kingdom whether you have only two or three hours, or several days. Surveys of guests reveal that most visitors stay five hours or more. Naturally, the more time set aside for your Disneyland visit, the more time you'll have to enjoy the shows added as special attractions during the summer months. If you wish overnight accommodations, the modern 305-room Disneyland Hotel, the official Hotel at Disneyland, is located directly across the street from thePark's Main Exit. There's also a complete Coffee Shop, Restaurant and shopping area at the hotel. For hotel information wriite directly to the Disneyland Hotel.

WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO VISIT DISNEYLAND?

The long-popular Disneyland Ticket Books offer convenience, flexibility and maximum savings for your day at the Magic Kingdom. Each Ticket Book is designed so that the family can enjoy Disneyland adventures together—or adults may choose their own adventures. Two value-packed Ticket Plans are available:
If you have a full day to enjoy Disneyland, we suggest the "Jumbo 15" book, which includes admission to the Park and a choice of 15 adventures, as the best bet for every member of the family. If time is limited the "Big 10" book, containing admission to Disneyland and a choice of ten adventures, provides an excellent introduction to the Magic Kingdom.
Effective June 10, prices for Disneyland Ticket Books are as follows:
The "Jumbo 15" Book: Children, $2.75; Juniors $3.25; Adults, $3.75. General Admission to Disneyland is also available at all times. Single admission prices are as follows: Children, 60 cents; Juniors, $1.20; Adults, $1.60.

DOES DISNEYLAND HAVE RESTAURANTS OR FOOD FACILITIES?
Twenty fine restaurants and "refreshment centers" are to be found within Disneyland, plus the Gourmet Restaurant at the Disneyland Hotel, reached by free passenger tram service from the Disneyland Main Entrance. The visitor will find every type of food service at Disneyland—from multi-course dinners to sandwiches and snacks, all at moderate prices.

IS DISNEYLAND SERVED BY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION?
To reach Disneyland by:
BUS—Regular schedules from various Southern California locations via Tanner Gray Line Motor Tours, Southland Bus lines, Pacific Greyhound Lines and the Metropolitan Transit Authority.
LIMOUSINE—Airport Coach Service and Tanner Gray Lines operate limousine service to Disneyland.
HELICOPTER—Los Angeles Airways operates daily Helicopter flights direct to Disneyland's own Heliport.

WHERE CAN I GET FURTHER DISNEYLAND INFORMATION?
For further information contact the Director of Customer Relations, Disneyland, Anaheim. Telephone Keystone 3-445.

Note: Prices and hours of operation subject to seasonal variation.

1961

1962

VACATIONLAND MAGAZINE WINTER/SPRING 1964

DISNEYLAND USA

"Disneyland will continue to grow, to add new things, as long as there is imagination left in the world." This pledge, made by master showman Walt Disney on Disneyland's Dedication Day, has ever since served as a guide in creating and expanding the world's foremost entertainment center.

Less than a decade ago, Disneyland was orange and walnut groves, part of the Dominguez Ranch. The story of Disneyland, like that of its creator, Walt Disney, is exciting, colorful and in many ways, unbelievable.

Disneyland is another dream-come-true for Walt Disney, the man whose business is making the world happy. More than 20 years ago, Walt began thinking of a new type of family entertainment that would be enjoyed by the young—of any age. He realized that just another amusement park with hot dog stands and carnival booths was not the answer, but that a whole new concept in family entertainment must be created. Out of this theoretical idea came to the reality that is now Disneyland.

Construction of Disneyland began on July 17, 1954, and exactly one year later, the first enchanted guests passed through the main gate turnstiles. Those first guests, just like those of today, entered a land that was bounded only by imagination and good taste.

During that year of construction activity was fast and furious, but well-planned. As engineers pushed pencils, bulldozers pushed earth; steel girders replaced orange trees; water was pumped in to fill machine-made cracters—and Disneyland began to take shape. Main Street, U.S.A., Adventureland, Frontierland, Fantasyland, and Tomorrowland all became realities.

The 65-acre area that was to become Disneyland rapidly developed. The tree-shaded plazas and spacious walkways belied the compactness of Disneyland, designed to place everything within easy walking distance of the visiting family.

Disneyland has grown not only out but up. The Swiss Familiy Robinson Treehouse is 70 feet tall, the Rocketship to the Moon is 80 feet high, and Sleeping Beauty's Castle reaches skyward to a height of 71 feet. As might be expected the tallest object in the Park is the Matterhorn, 147 feet of man-made mountain.

Walt promised that the Magic Kingdom would never be complete—and he has kept that promise. When the Park opened there were 22 major attractions, while today there is a total of 48 attractions not including free shows, shops and exhibits. Each added attraction presents to Disneyand visitors a new facet of the Disney genius and creativity.

Three attractions that have proven to be among the most popular were opened on June 14, 1959: The Disneyland-Alweg Monorail, the Matterhorn Bobsleds, and the Submarine Voyage. Rising fourten stories high, the snow-capped Matterhorn can be seen for miles. The Disneyland Monorail provides an unparalleled panorama of Disneyland and the surrounding area. Disneyland's eight submarines, replicas of the nuclear-powered Nautilus, explore the fascinating world beneath the ocean's surface.

Four more attractions have been added during the past two years: the Flying Saucers (August 6, 1961); the Safari Shooting Gallery and the Swiss Family Robinson Treehouse (June 15, 1963) and the brand-new Enchanted Tiki Room, which began astounding visitors on June 15 of last year. In addition, in 1962 the ever-popular Jungle Cruise was expanded to include the enchanting Sacred Bathing Pool of the Indian elephants.

Two more exciting attractions are presently under construction. The Disneyland Haunted House, built for ghosts who like people, will be completed in1965. The residents of the Haunted House will be populated by world-famous ghosts presently being gathered from the four conrers of the earth. New Orleans Square will recreate the atmosphere and flavor that became famous as the French Quarter, a large slice of the Americana Walt Disney is bringing to Southern California.

As Disneyland grew, so grew the numbers of visitors who came to be spirited away into the realm of enjoyment. More than 40 million guests have stepped form the everyday world into a land of Disney-woven magic. Theyhave come from every state in the Union and more than 100 foreign countries. Kings, queens, presidents—all come to be enchanted by Disneyland.

Disneyland is much more than attractions and statistics: it is people. People who operate rides, people who serve food, and people who work behind the scens. People like Wally Boag, star performer in the Golden Horseshoe Revue; people like Theresa Babi, one of the 27 Tour Guides who conduct visitors through the Magic Kingdom; and people like Ray Miller, who is responsible for the beautiful and authentic vegetation in Disneyland.

All these Disneylanders are here for but one purpose, to make your visit to the Magic Kingdom more enjoyable. Disneylanders are easy to spot—they all come equipped with a smile and a friendly greeting.

But the Disneyland story is not just the story of attractions and people. Disneyland is a feeling. It is nostalgia, enchantment, wonderment and thrills. Disneyland cannot be described because it produces a different combination of such feelings in every person. According to one longtime Disneyland: "Once the pixie dust gets inyour eyes, it's impossible to get it out."

Perhaps that is what makes Disneyland the Magic Kingdom. Not only the place, not only the people, but the idea—the idea that Disneyland is truly,"The Happiest Place on Earth."

******

Information for Your Visit to Disneyland

WHERE IS DISNEYLAND LOCATED?

Disneyland is located within the city of Anaheim, California, about 35 minutes by auto from downtown Los Angeles, via the Santa Ana Freeway southeast to Harbor Boulevard in Anaheim.

From other locations in Southern California refer to the map.

WHAT HOURS IS DISNEYLAND OPEN?

During the Fall and Winter, Disneyland is open Wednesday thrrough Sunday, from 10 A.M. to 6 P.M. Disneyand is open daily from March 18 to April 5.

During Easter Week, March 22 to 29, Disneyland is open daily from 9 A.M. to 9 P.M.

HOW LONG SHOULD YOU PLAN TO STAY?

Disneyland is designed so that you can enjoy a complete visit to the Magic Kingdom whether you have only a few hours or several days. Surveys reveal that most visitors explore five hours or more.

If you wish overnight accommodations, the modern 450-room Disneyland Hotel, the official hotel of Disneyland, is located on West Blvd., directly across the street from the parking lot exit. There also is a coffee shop, restaurant, shopping area, and 40-acre golf center. For reservations write to Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim.

WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO VISIT DISNEYLAND?

If you are a "first-time" visitor to Disneyland we recommend the Guided Tour. The Tour is approximately two hours and after its completion you will have plenty of time to enjoy Disneyland's many attractions, exhibits, shows, shops and restaurants.

For family groups we recommend the Disneyland Ticket Books for maximum thrift and enjoyment. Two Ticket Books are available. They are the DELUXE 15 and the BIG 10. The DELUXE 15 includes general admissions to Disneyland and a chocie of 15 Disneyland adventures, rides and attractions.

Prices are:

DELUXE 15—Child (3-11) $3.95; Junior (12-17) $4.45; and Adults (18 and over) $4.95.

BIG 10—Child $2.95; Junior $3.45; Adult $3.95.

Regular General Admission is: Child, 60 cents; Juniors, $1.20; and Adults, $1.60.

DOES DISNEYLAND HAVE DINING FACILITIES?

Disneyland has twenty fine restaurants and refreshment centers. In addition, there is The Gourment Restaurant and coffee shop at the Disneyland Hotel, which can be reached by free tram from Disneyland’s Entrance or via Monorail.

IS DISNEYLAND SERVED BY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION?

Yes, Disneyland is served by various types of transportation as noted below:

BUS — Tanner Gray Line Motor Tours, Pacific Greyhound Lines and the Metropolitan Transi tAuthority. Union Pacific Railroad Bus from East Los Angeles Station.

HELICOPTER — Los Angeles Airways flies daily to the Disneyland Heliport, located adjacent to the Disneyland Hotel.
LIMOUSINE — Airport Coach Service and Tanner Gray Lines.

WHERE CAN I GET FURTHER DISNEYLAND INFORMATION?

Contact the Director of Customer Relations, Disneyland, Anaheim, California. Phone KEystone 3-4456, Extension 481. Prices and Park hours subject to change without notice.

1963—1965

1966

VACATIONLAND MAGAZINE SUMMER 1967

Vacationland Summer 1967 Art 1Vacationland Summer 1967 Art 2Letters from all over the world pour into Disneyland at an average of more than 1,500 per month, requesting information about the Magic Kingdom. The most-often-asked questions are answered by the facts on this page:

INFORMATION FOR YOUR VISIT TO DISNEYLAND

WHERE IS DISNEYLAND LOCATED?

Disneyland is located within the city of Anaheim, California, about 35 minutes by auto from downtown Los Angeles, via the Santa Ana Freeway southeast to Harbor Boulevard in Anaheim.

WHEN IS DISNEYLAND OPEN?

During the summer season, beginning June 24, Disneyland is open 9 a.m. ’til June 24, Disneyland is open 9 a.m. ’til 1a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and 9 a.m. ’til midnight Sunday through Thursday.

Disneyland returns to its Winter schedule on September 18. During that period the Park is open Wednesday through Sunday.

WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO VISIT DISNEYLAND?

If you are a first-time visitor to Disneyland, we recommend the Guided Tour. It lasts approximately two hours and includes admission to six Disneyland adventures. After its completion, you will have plenty of time to enjoy the Park’s many other attractions, exhibits, shows, shops, and restaurants.

For family groups we recommend the Disneyland Ticket Books, for maximum thrift and enjoyment. Two types of Ticket Books are available. They are the BIG 10 and the DELUXE 15. The BIG 10 includes admission and a choice of 10 Disneyland adventures and attractions. The DELUXE 15 includes a choice of 15 Disneyland adventures and attractions.

Vacationland Summer 1967 Disneyland Prices

HOW LONG SHOULD YOU PLAN TO STAY?

Disneyland is designed so that you can enjoy a complete visit to the Magic Kingdom for only a few hours, or several days. Most visitors explore its five lands at least five hours or more.
If you wish overnight accommodations, the modern 610-room Disneyland Hotel, official hotel of the Park, is located on West Street, directly across the street from the parking lot exit. There also is a coffee shop, restaurant, shopping area, and 40-acre golf center. For reservations write: Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim.

DOES DISNEYLAND HAVE DINING FACILITIES?

Disneyland has twenty fine restaurants and refreshment centers. In addition, there is a coffee shop and the Gourment Restaurant at the Disneyland Hotel, which can be reached via Monorail or by free tram from Disneyland’s Entrance.

IS DISNEYLAND SERVED BY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION?

Yes, by various types, as noted below: Bus — Tanner Gray Line Motor Tours, Pacific Greyhound Lines and the Southern California Rapid Transit District, Union Pacific Railroad Bus from East Los Angeles Station, Aztec Bus Line. Helicopter — Los Angeles Airways flies several daily flights to the Heliport, located adjacent to the Disneyland Hotel.

Limousine — Airport Coach Service and Tanner Gray Lines.

WHERE CAN I GET FURTHER DISNEYLAND INFORMATION?

Contact the Director of Customer Relations, Disneyland, Anaheim, California, 92803. Phone KEystone 3-4456, Extension 731. Prices and Park hours subject to change without notice.

1967–1969 & MISC. 1960’s

WELCOME VALERIE SULDO: 100 MILLIONTH GUEST!

Mickey Mouse, Pluto, Goofy hang the 100 millionth guest sign at DisneylandValerie Suldo, 100th millionth guest at Disneyland photo, June 17, 1971(L) Disneyland Marketing Director Jack Lindquist is shown standing at the podium at Main Street Train Station with Valerie Suldo, 100 millionth guest of Disneyland, on June 17, 1971. I was able to get in touch with Valerie and she was kind enough to send these additional photos from that memorable day.

From the Disney publicity machine comes this article:

MEET Disneyland's 100 MILLIONth GUEST, Miss Valerie Suldo

On the morning of June 17, petite Valerie Suldo, a New Brunswick, N.J., payroll clerk, made history by becoming the 100 millionth person to visit Disneyland in its 16-year history.

Miss Suldo, accompanied by her sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Stan Wyluda of San Diego, walked through the turnstile at 11:14 a.m. to being her first visit to Disneyland. No sooner had she done so that she was greeted by popping flashbulbs, batteries of newsmen, and a crowd of several thousand Disneylanders.

Valerie Suldo at DisneylandValerie Suldo, 100th millionth guest at Disneyland photo, June 17, 1971"I just couldn't believe it—and still don't," the 22-year-old-brunette said in a post-ceremony interview. "It's by far the biggest thing that's ever happened to me."

Valerie’s arrival was announced by Jack Lindquist, Disneyland's Director of Marketing, in cremonies in front of Town Square Station at the Park's entrance. There, it was announced that she would receive a "Silver Pass" to Disneyland and Walt Disney World (good for admission to both Parks and all their attractions for a party of four), $100 in Bank of America traveler's checks, a United Air Lines personal credit card with $100 free credit, a complete GAF movie camera outfit, a one-year supply of Kal Kan pet food for her dog, a one-year supply of coffee from Hills Brothers Cofffee, a one-year supply of Coca-Cola plus several Coca-Cola premium products, a selection of Pepsi-Cola/Frito products, and a symbolic plaque from Pacific Telephone and the Bell Telephone System, commemorating her historic visit.

After the ceremonies, Valerie was accompanied by bands, Disney characters, and news personnel during her triumphant ride up Main Street to Sleeping Beauty Castle, where she was the first signer of a special guest book prepared for the occasion. Her signature and all others collected during the day were later placed permanently in the Disney archives.

DISNEYLAND LINE NEWSLETTER 6/29/78

While Strolling Through the Park One Day...

Among the many services that Disneyland provides for its guests is the facility that helps put our non-ambulatory visitors on wheels: the Stroller and Wheelchair Shop. With 1500 strollers and over 100 wheelchairs to clean, repair and rent out to guests, the location's Merchandise Hosts and Hostesses have plenty to keep them busy.

When a guest pays his or her $1.00 fee and $1.00 deposit for a stroller or wheelchair, he or she expects to be given a sturdy, clean and pushable unit. The Hosts and Hostesses at the Stroller Shop strive to see that every expectation is fulfilled and exceeded. A pool of available vehicles is fed from the neat stacks of folded strollers in the backroom. While Stroller Shop personnel pull from these stacks, they make sure that all units are operational.

Most stroller repairs are done in the Shop by the Stroller crew. In fact, when guests' strollers suffer mishaps while in use in the Park, the Stroller Shop acts as a pit stop where minor repairs can be made. The equipment and skills utilized in the Stroller Shop have become more and more sophisticated. Don Carter, day Working Leader, explains that this increase in repair knowledge and abilities has resulted in a 70-75% decrease in the number of strollers that need to be sent out of the Park for repairs. Don adds that there is a feeling of accomplishment in fixing a stroller and making it usable, and says, "A repaired stroller is a thing of beauty."

Until recently, guests were asked to leave a form of identification when renting strollers, so that they would bring the units back. Now, however, the new procedure of keeping $1.00 as collateral speeds up the stroller-return process at the end of the night.

"The nights are very different from the days," explains night Working Leader Charlie Moss. While the day cre is kept busy repairing and renting out strollers, the night crew seems to get all the units back at one time, right after the Electrical Parade. Then they have to be cleaned, broken down and stacked.

The Stroller Shop, once staffed only by Merchandise Hosts, now is operated by a crew that includes many Merchandise Hostesses as well. The girls like the non-stop hustle and bustle that the shop provides, and find that the lifting and pushing help to keep them in shape.

The Stroller and Wheelchair Shop accomodates those guests who require their own mobile units to enjoy the Park. So, when guests want to get "pushy," send them to the Stroller Shop.

1970’s–1980’s

1990’s–Now